McCormick Named Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs

Chattanooga, TN — July 1 marked a special day for Kimberly McCormick when she officially began her duties as Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at Chattanooga State Community College. At Chattanooga State since 2008, Dr. McCormick has served as interim dean in the Business and Information Technologies Division and as an associate vice president within two different divisions before being named to her new position.

During her first week on the job, McCormick began establishing a strong working partnership with academic leadership. “I will face the same challenges that anyone faces in a new position … building relationships, earning support and trust, and setting the tone to ensure that all full and part-time faculty as well as students are fully supported in their success,” states McCormick.

McCormick has a background in educational leadership with an emphasis in progressive curriculum and instructional design/development, program/faculty development, and relative assessment. She earned her Doctor of Education degree in higher education administration from Tennessee State University in 2010; Educational Specialist in instructional leadership degree, Tennessee Technological University, 2004; Master of Education in curriculum and instruction design, Vanderbilt University, 1990; and Bachelor of Science, psychology, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, 1989.

Several of her more recent accomplishments in 2014 include being recognized for her educational contributions by Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam during his State of the State Address, receiving the League for Innovation Excellence Award, and being named a finalist for the Bellwether Award for SAILS Tennessee program development.

A Red Bank graduate, McCormick was inducted into the Red Bank High School Hall of Fame in 2004. She was appointed to the UTC Alumni Board of Directors in 2007, and was recently named to the Tennessee Achieves Post-Secondary Oversight Board and the local advisory board of directors for TN Achieves.

With Dr. McCormick’s long history of educational service to Hamilton County, her goal of ensuring successful outcomes for faculty and students will compliment Tennessee’s Drive to 55 and Tennessee Promise which states that “beginning with the Class of 2015, the Tennessee Promise will provide Tennessee high school graduates the opportunity to attend a community or technical college free of charge.” Tennessee high school graduates may begin applying online to the Tennessee Promise program starting in August and concluding November 1, 2014.

Chattanooga State is now enrolling students for the Fall 2014 semester. For more information please visit www.chattanoogastate.edu.

2nd Annual WE Symposium

Chattanooga, Tenn. (July 10, 2014)— The WE | women entrepreneur symposium (formerly named Women At The Top Symposium or W.A.T.T.S) will be held on Tuesday, August 5, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Stratton Hall.

Congressman Chuck Fleischmann, Honorary WE Chairperson, invites all women entrepreneurs to a symposium featuring Sloane Scott, a.k.a. the “Digital Diva” of FLO Thinkery, as the keynote speaker, and a panel discussion led by some of the best and brightest women in business. “This will be an enriching experience for female business owners and start-ups,” said Sharyn Moreland, Director of the TSBDC. “We anticipate over 300 female business leaders who will spend the morning generating new ideas and energy so they can produce an even bigger spark in their business and community,” added Moreland.

ue Malone, founder of Strategies for Small Business, Solutions for Success, will facilitate the symposium and Dr. Donna Van Natten will share ideas on how women in business can become more effective through the use of effective body language. “Our bodies speak volumes in a business situation…awareness needs to be intentional,” said Dr. Donna Van Natten.

The panel discussion will be moderated by Ronelle Sellers, Partner of Southside Creative Group, and include women entrepreneurs and mentors. Panelists include:  Kristina Montague of The Jump Fund, Kim White of River City Company, Alicia Brown-Oliver of Chambliss Bahner & Stophel, PC, and Cherita Adams, Co-owner of Blue Orleans Seafood Restaurant and Co-owner of NOLA Busy Bee Agency and more.

The event is free for all attendees. Limited Parking – Car Pooling is recommended. Complimentary breakfast provided.

Event registration is online at: www.WomenEntrepreneursCha.eventbrite.com

For additional information, call 423-424-4220 or email crollins@brightbridgeinc.org.

Platinum and gold sponsors include:  Brightbridge Women’s Business Center / SBA Women’s Business Center; Chambliss, Bahner & Stophel, P.C.; Chattanooga State Small Business Development Center, Co-Lab; EPB Fiber Optics; Henderson + Gouger, PLLC; Henderson Hutcherson & McCullough, PLLC; Reliance Partners; Southside Creative Group.

Second LEGO Robotics Camp for Kids Scheduled

Due to the overwhelming popularity of a recent LEGO Robotics Camp held at ChattState’s Sequatchie/Bledsoe site, a second class has been scheduled for July 28-August 1. The camp for children 8-12 years of age, will be held from 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Central Time. The cost is $109 per student. The ChattState Sequatchie/Bledsoe site is located at 26297 Highway 127 between Dunlap and Pikeville.

For more than 80 years, LEGO’s have enriched the lives of children by stimulating learning and development through play – a key element of LEGO philosophy. As children continue to learn and enjoy their LEGO experiences, LEGO education spans the continuum from preschool through university to provide valuable lessons in all curriculum subjects from STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) to humanities, language and literacy.

Established in 1998, First LEGO league is an annual science and technology competition for children and youth ages nine to 16. The LEGO Robotics Camp will be using this concept to design, program, and manipulate LEGO robots, and campers will compete as if in a real robot competition. Campers also will use LEGO NXT kits to have fun and learn to solve real-world problems by applying STEM concepts.

To register, parents may call the Office of Continuing Education at 423.697.3100 or use the online registration process at this link: http://www.chattanoogastate.edu/continuing-education/.

Exemplary Mathematics & Sciences Employees Recognized

Chattanooga, TN — The recipients of the 2013-14 Mathematics and Sciences Division Excellence Awards at Chattanooga State include Dr. Azar Raiszadeh, David Wollert, Janice Neal, Julie Franklin, and Carolyn Clark. Dr. Mosunmola George-Taylor, division dean, recently announced the award winners who were selected from a pool of nominees by members of the Division Excellence Award Committee.

Awarded the Full-Time Faculty Division Excellence Award in Mathematics, Dr. Azar Raiszadeh taught her assigned classes, coordinated two courses being taught as high school Bridge Math through the Seamless Alignment and Integrated Learning Support (SAILS) Tennessee initiative funded by Governor Haslam, and led the Math 1530 course for the Global Scholars program in Fall 2013. Incorporating hands-on life experiences made it more interesting and challenging to students. She and her team completed a grant proposal and received funding for a Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) course revitalization initiative.

David Wollert, winner of the Full-Time Faculty Division Excellence Award in Sciences, teaches microbiology and developed an online lecture version, extensively restructured Human Biology classes, coordinated TED Talk lunch sessions, and is a member of the College’s Fellows Committee and Technology Mobilization Committees. He co-chaired the Assessment In the Majors (AIM) Institutional Student Learning Outcomes (ISLO) assessment initiative last year and currently serves as one of two team leaders for AIM’s critical thinking group. As an instructor with very high positive student evaluation, his focus is on students.

Janice Neal is an outstanding adjunct instructor who was awarded the Adjunct Faculty Division Excellence Award in Mathematics. She works diligently with her students and is an effective tutor in the Mathematics Center. Her dedication to her students is clear in the way she teaches and interacts with them.

With a background as a medical technologist Julie Franklin joined the Microbiology team in the Life Sciences Department in Fall 2011. She brought years of clinical experience and a strong healthcare emphasis to lab instruction. Awarded the Adjunct Faculty Division Excellence Award in Sciences, she has improved student assessment and classroom work ethics, better organized materials to make them student-friendly, been reliable, accessible, and always prepared.

Awarded the Staff Division Excellence Award, Carolyn Clark serves as division secretary. She is often seen offering assistance to faculty and students in the office and hallways. Her outstanding customer service skills are apparent in the way she deals with faculty, staff, students, and visitors. In addition to her duties in the division she assists with activities and festivals around the campus as part of her College-wide service. Ms. Clark’s community service includes participating in women’s ministry and youth ministry at her church.

Dr. George-Taylor introduced the Mathematics and Sciences Division Excellence Awards in 2006. Annual winners each receive a plaque and restaurant gift card.

Founded in 1965, Chattanooga State is a public community college serving more than 11,000 students from Chattanooga and Hamilton, Rhea, Sequatchie, Marion, Bledsoe and Grundy counties.

I Heard It On The Radio!

Chattanooga, TN — The timing of the big announcement this week about Chattanooga landing Volkswagen’s newest line of SUVs could not have worked better for the open house sponsored by the Engineering Technology Division at Chattanooga State. More than 110 people clamored to the college to learn more about the engineering technology programs offered that may help them secure one of the expected 2,000 new jobs created by this expansion. According to Tim McGhee, dean of the Engineering Technology Division, “one man heard an announcement about it on the radio during the actual open house, and drove on over to just to attend it!”

Guests at the open house were warmly welcomed and divided their time between the CETAS (Center for Engineering, Technology And Science) and the CAT (Center for Advanced Technology) buildings where they enjoyed, and sometimes participated in, lab demonstrations by instructors from approximately 12-15 of the engineering technology programs that ChattState offers.

One of the most popular exhibits at the open house was the 3-D printer and learning about its capabilities, demonstrated by lab technician Philip Hobbs. “The open house event was an opportunity to showcase the very best of what the Engineering Technology Division has to offer – an exciting STEM educational experience delivered by our very own world-class faculty,” states McGhee.

Attendees were able to meet with advisors to apply to the college and/or seek help to complete their enrollment requirements in addition to exploring all that the engineering technology programs have to offer.

The Engineering Technology Division is now enrolling students for the Fall 2014 semester. The Engineering Technology Division offers four Associate of Applied Science degrees with 20 concentrations, a Pre-Engineering transfer program, and one Technical Certificate in Computer Aided Drafting. Participants will discover pathways for high-demand, high-wage STEM careers through Engineering Technology programs of study.

For more information about its programs visit www.chattanoogastate.edu/engineering-technology/ or call the Engineering Technology Division at 423-697-4434.

nuclear technology Philip Hobbs & 3D printer felicia elkins & robot

Sequatchie/Bledsoe Site Open House is July 29

Chattanooga State Sequatchie/Bledsoe site is hosting an open house on July 29 from 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. Central Time. Faculty and staff will be on site to provide enrollment information, answer questions, and give tours. Refreshments will be available.

A variety of classes will be offered this fall and students can seek help in finding one to fit their schedule. Available classes include accounting, biology, business, chemistry, computer-aided design, reading, economics, English, history, humanities, information systems, mathematics, music, political science, psychology, personal & college success, sociology, speech, and commercial truck driving. Many of the courses meet general education requirements.

Recent improvements to communication infrastructure have allowed faster Internet speeds that vastly enhance the learning experience for students. As a national leader in technology, Chattanooga State is proud of the upgrades made to the Sequatchie/Bledsoe site.

Chattanooga State registration for Fall 2014 classes is underway. Visit the Sequatchie/Bledsoe site at 26297 Highway 127, located between Dunlap and Pikeville; call 423.554.4027 or visit www.chattanoogastate.edu.

2 From Chattanooga State Music Program Perform In The King And I

 

pair

Many of the Chattanooga State music faculty perform in the southeast, including with the Chattanooga Symphony Orchestra.  Dr. Jennifer Arbogast, an assistant professor of music, continues that tradition with a musical performance as Anna in “The King and I” at Signal Mountain Playhouse, which runs through July 26.

Appearing alongside Dr. Arbogast is one of her students, vocal performance major Kimberlin Lacy. “Perhaps the most wonderful part of this show has been the opportunity to share this experience with Kimberlin,” shares Dr. Arbogast, “she has blossomed into a lovely young performer who has carried herself with incredible professionalism throughout the process.”

jarbogast2Dr. Arbogast describes the whole team at Signal Mountain Playhouse as “fantastic.” She calls Allan Ledford her “dream director” and was completely sold on the experience when she found out that he would be directing. Besides working with other ChattState performers, Dr. Arbogast has had the chance to work opposite of Seth Carico, a professional opera singer under contract with Deutsche Opera Berlin. “I’ve learned a lot from watching him work and working with him, and it’s been an inspiration for me as an artist to continue to sharpen my own skills,” says Dr. Arbogast.

Ms. Lacy adds, “It has been great working with Mr. Ledford. He is a wonderfully constructive critic who has helped me really develop ‘Tuptim,’ to make the character my own. With such amazing energy, the cast and crew are a pure joy to work alongside.”

Dr. Arbogast teaches voice, music appreciation, and musical theatre at Chattanooga State. She holds a doctor of arts degree in vocal performance from Ball State University, where she studied with internationally acclaimed soprano, Dr. Mei Zhong. In addition to Signal Mountain Playhouse, she has performed with the Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga, Artisti Affamati, and Chattanooga State.  Dr. Arbogast has musically directed more than dozen shows, including “Xanadu,” “You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown,” “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum,” and “Avenue Q.”

Having been recommended to Chattanooga State’s music program by her high school choir director, Ms. Lacy successfully auditioned for a music scholarship. She begins her final year at Chattanooga State this fall. Darrin Hassevoort, dean of Humanities and Fine Arts, calls Ms. Lacy, “a rising star.”

kimberlin2Ms. Lacy studies voice with Dr. Arbogast, performs as a member of the Concert Choir under the direction of Dean Hassevoort, and also appears in opera theatre and musical theatre productions. Most recently at Chattanooga State, she was seen as Yum-Yum in “The Mikado,” Olive Ostrovsky in “25th Annual…Spelling Bee,” Calliope in “Xanadu,” and was in the ensemble of “Nutcracker Christmas Carol” through Chattanooga State’s Repertory Theatre. Additionally, she was a member of the 2014 Senior Ensemble at Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga, where she played Lady Caroline in “Dear Brutus” and was in the ensemble of “Jekyll and Hyde.”

The Chattanooga State music department provides a comprehensive program for a student’s first two years. It is designed to meet the educational requirements of students whether they are preparing to earn a music degree, interested in private instruction for a specific instrument, or seeking to fulfill general education credits. Dean Hassevoort shares that some of their recent graduates have attended and graduated from Bryan College, Lee University, UTC, Radford University in Virginia, and the prestigious Peabody Conservatory housed at John Hopkins in Baltimore, Maryland.

For more information about Chattanooga State’s music program and scholarship opportunities, please call 697-3383 or visit http://chattanoogastate.edu/humanities-fine-arts/theatre-arts.

Engineering Technology Open House

Chattanooga, TN — The Engineering Technology Division of Chattanooga State Community College will hold an open house on July 17 from 4:00 to 7:00 p.m. in the Center for Advanced Technology building on the main campus. Reservations for the event may be made through Felicia Elkins, Tech-Track coordinator, at 423-697-3252.

The Division of Engineering Technology offers education and training for the careers of the future. More than ever workers are retiring in fields requiring technical know-how. In addition, as distribution centers, automotive manufacturers and chemical processors move into the area, the demand for highly skilled workers continues to increase.

The Engineering Technology Division offers four Associate of Applied Science degrees with twenty concentrations, a Pre-Engineering transfer program, and one Technical Certificate in Computer Aided Drafting. Participants will discover pathways for high demand, high wage STEM careers through Engineering Technology programs of study.

For more information visit www.chattanoogastate.edu/engineering-technology/ or call the Engineering Technology Division at 423-697-4434.

Looking Back While Looking Ahead

Dr. Fannie Hewlett Reflects on Her 35-Year Career at Chattanooga State

Chattanooga, TN — June 30th will mark the end of Dr. Fannie Hewlett’s illustrious career at Chattanooga State. Hired as a psychology instructor in 1976 at Cleveland State, a colleague notified Hewlett of an opening for a psychology instructor at Chattanooga State in 1979, that would be closer to home and an easier commute for her. The rest, as they say, is history. Prior to 2001, Hewlett served as an instructor, department head and dean before being named Vice President for Academic Affairs. In 2011, her academic role expanded and she was named the college’s first Provost.

With a smile, Hewlett remembers the late 1970s. Known as “The Growing Years,” she recalls a completely different campus look than the current one that included only a Technology Center, Instructional Materials Building (Library), Student Center and a Physical Education Building. “The community college movement reached its zenith in the late 1970’s and early 1980’s and Chattanooga State experienced exponential growth,” states Hewlett.

According to Hewlett, the most exciting thing to happen in education during her tenure was a refocusing from a “teacher driven process to a learner driven process” where institutions became more concerned with students and the way instructors approach teaching. As technology entered the picture, it was critical for faculty to move forward. She cited keeping abreast of changes occurring to meet the outcome goals of TBR (TN Board of Regents) and SACS (Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, accrediting agency) as challenges facing future academic administrators.

One of the things Hewlett is most proud of is her administrative team. Through the years she has employed the strengths of her staff to achieve academic goals. “When the RODP (Regents Online Degree Program) was first introduced, all TBR institutions were expected to participate as part of a collaborative initiative focusing on increasing access opportunities for students and to provide funding even if we were not using it,” she recalls. Under the leadership of Dr. Hewlett and her staff, what was once a program operating in the red here at Chattanooga State, now brings in more than $1 million each year.

Known for her vivacious personality, it is not hard to believe that Dr. Hewlett stays motivated by what the next day holds. “There is a new challenge around every corner,” says Hewlett. Although awards hold meaning to her, she cherishes the ones that have to do with teaching or administrative excellence, a measurement that says, “what I do matters.”

Dr. Hewlett was present when Governor Haslam visited Chattanooga State to announce the recently enacted law called Tennessee Promise. She has hopes it will make education more affordable to a great many students. Although Tennessee Promise benefits graduating high school seniors in Tennessee with a 2.0 GPA or greater beginning in 2015, more than 55 percent of Chattanooga State students are age 25 and older. Hewlett’s advice to those students is to find a job at a company that pays for your education. Older students need to stress to employers how additional education will benefit the company.

As June 30th approaches, Dr. Hewlett looks forward to spending more time with her husband of 40 years, Jesse, her children and grandchildren, traveling, and catching up on recreational reading. Hewlett is a long-time member of Warren Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church and enjoys working with Charisma Club, a small civic club in Chattanooga.

Reflection aside, Dr. Hewlett says she will miss the people of Chattanooga State the most, but “I am ready to enjoy what I’ve been working toward all my life,” says Hewlett.

SAILS Program Transforms Math Readiness

Chattanooga, TN — When the SAILS Program (Seamless Alignment and Integrated Learning Support) was piloted at Red Bank High School several years ago, educators had high hopes. During its first year of the statewide expansion, statistics show that “786 out of 1,043 students in Hamilton County who participated in the SAILS Program wiped out their need for developmental math in college,” states Dr. Robert Denn, Dean, Honors and Special Programs at Chattanooga State. “Many schools had near or at 100 percent completion rate,” he adds.

The SAILS Program introduces the college developmental math curriculum in the high school senior year. By embedding the Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) Learning Support Math competencies in the high school Bridge Math course, students can get a head start on their college career. Students who successfully complete the program are ready to take a college math course, saving them time and money while accelerating their path to graduation.

Looking ahead to the 2014-2015 school year, 1,495 students from all 19 high schools in Hamilton County will be participating in the SAILS Program thus potentially eliminating the need for remedial math classes when they graduate. As part of Governor Haslam’s Drive to 55 Initiative, SAILS has attracted national attention for its innovative and practical solution to the college readiness program, and Chattanooga State is leading the way in transforming the college-readiness landscape in the State of Tennessee.

For more information about SAILS, visit http://www.chattanoogastate.edu/high-school/sails or contact Dr. Robert Denn at 423.697.2648.